Somersham Fen 40 x 40 x 4 cm

This painting based on Somersham Fen has been created using oil and cold wax medium on a canvas stretcher. The intense yellow of rapeseed dominates the Fenlands at certain times of the year; it saturates the retina. For a painter, the task is to capture the overwhelming power of colour and yet also retain structure and form in the painting. The heavy impasto of cold wax helps to establish the solidity and sculptural qualities of the landscape near the Fenland village of Somersham.

‘We associate yellow with warmth, sunshine, and positivity. Bright yellow is an attention-getter, and its contrast with black is the most visible color combination.

‘Despite its association with cheerfulness and warmth, yellow carries a surprising number of negative connotations. Yellow is a symbol of cowardice, of sickness, and of mental illness. It’s the color of sensationalism and even of excess. Vibrant yellow is typically used with caution by designers, though paler yellows can certainly have a modest uplifting effect. Too much bright yellow can easily overwhelm a project’. source: The Meaning of Colour

Somersham Fen: (detail)
Somersham Fen (detail)

White Vision

People are used to seeing peacocks display coats and tails of splendid colors, but a white peacock is an unusual find. Some of the meanings that different societies attach to the multicolored birds include nobility, guidance, beauty and fidelity. The same attributes are also paid to white peacocks, but humans also pin other forms of symbolism on them because of their white hue.

‘According to the My Power Animals website, the Order of the White Peacock is an ancient order of shamans that are descended from the planet Venus. Both the white peacock and a highly revered shaman named Lord Sananda are considered to be the symbols of this order. The birds are regarded as protectors since they guard the order’s temple on Venus and cry out to warn when someone is approaching’.

If you believe that….you will believe anything 🙂

peacock