River City (or My Stenographic Significance)

River City (provisional)

untitled-3-of-3100 x 100 x 3cm acrylic and oil paint on canvas

‘River City’ is just a holding name at the moment. I know approximately what I want to say, but haven’t quite found the combination of words that will shed some light on the painting. I know that for some artists, titles for paintings are not necessarily important; some artists even decide to number their work sequentially, particularly with abstract paintings.

For me, a title can add certain qualities to an image, they often act as a bridge between the artist and the viewer. Interestingly,  a random title generator is available free to use (see link below) which can be a lot of fun if you want to create something entirely meaningless and bizarre. I don’t think ‘Secret Ode to Lonely St George’ quite has it………..I’ll keep working on it and let you know how it goes.

The Abstract Art Titlegenerator – Noemata.net

You can see this painting at the Michaelhouse Centre in Cambridge from November 7th – 19th

 

 

 

 

Detail from ‘River City’

untitled-9-of-211

 

Optical Mantra

optical-mantra

This painting is part of my ‘Cambridge Envisaged’ series. It is a mixed media, abstract work based on the city of Cambridge in the United Kingdom. Cambridge is a world renowned  university city and the recurring motifs of Gothic arches and ancient doorways provide a visual rhythm, reflecting both the passing of time and continuity. The textures and patina of well worn stone respond to sight and touch. At this time of year, shafts of diffused golden light illuminate walkways, paths and enclosed architectural spaces as you wander through the colleges and grounds.  The river Cam flows through and across the city, below the ornate towers and spires, carrying new life and  old memories.

‘Optical Mantra’ Canvas size: 80x80x2cm

Hierarchy

This is a mixed media acrylic painting on canvas; one of a series of paintings to be shown at the Michaelhouse Centre in Cambridge at the ‘Cambridge Envisaged’ exhibition this November. I wanted to represent the city primarily through abstraction by  using archetypal shapes, colours and textures that reflect aspects of the buildings and townscape. The composition plays alternately with illusionistic perspective and a flat ‘map like’ design, never quite allowing the eye to settle on a particular viewpoint or reading.

hierachy
‘Hierarchy’ Canvas size: 80x80x2cm

River City

 

untitled-4-of-28

River City

Acrylic painting on canvas 100 x 100 cm

I am currently working on a series of paintings based on the city of Cambridge in the UK.

This is a multi layered mixed media acrylic painting on a high quality canvas frame. I am currently working on a series of paintings based on the city of Cambridge. I don’t believe that we can ever really know a particular place or location, not in a purely objective way, not even through the ‘impartiality’ of a camera lens. There are so many different ways of seeing, understanding and interpreting; our view of the world is a subjective, personal experience.

I have developed these paintings through a sort of conversational process, an exchange of ideas and thoughts; of talking and listening. What you see here is the result of many such conversations; a constant give and take between what I think I have to say as a painter and what the painting has to say to me. The painting often contradicts me and frequently suggests that I may be mistaken in my views. Out of consideration for my feelings it may abruptly suggest alternative ways of progressing. I sometimes delude myself into thinking I am directing the conversation but I know that this human activity of ‘painting’ is a joint construction, a combined effort. What you see here is a partnership between planning and accident, conceit and humility, confidence and deflation, wisdom and foolishness, a conversation between friends……we were just talking about the city…..I expect the conversation will continue.

Empire of The Sun

Empire of The Sun

Acrylic on canvas

Size: 100 x 100 x 2cm

This is a multi layered acrylic painting on a high quality canvas frame. In this larger scale work I have been preoccupied with the rhythmic qualities of hand writing and calligraphy; I have tried to infuse the surface of the canvas with a sense of light and intensity. There is no over arching composition here; all of the myriad small brush-stokes and simple forms connect with and relate to each other. Below the radiating surface of indecipherable marks, there is a counterpoint of horizontal bands of tone and colour, echoing land and distant horizons.

 

https://www.artfinder.com/manage/peter-corr/product/empire-of-the-sun-26da/

untitled (3 of 48)

Switchback

Switchback

 

untitled (61 of 76)

Up here among the gull cries
we stroll through a maze of pale
red-mottled relics, shells, claws

as if it were summer still.
That season has turned its back.
Through the green sea gardens stall

(from) Sylvia Plath

 

This painting developed from a desire to create a sense of movement across the surface of the canvas. The style is reminiscent of cubism and the image is built up from a network of short brush strokes and intersecting shards of light. The subject matter is concerned with the natural world, shoals of fish darting to and fro, fields of wild flowers alternately caught in the breeze, birds in flight amidst the clouds and sunlight.

Western Shore

Western Shore

untitled (1 of 26)

 

This is an acrylic painting measuring 80 x 80 cm on canvas. It is based on the landscape of the Great Fen, thought to have once been covered by Whittlesea Mere. I have been exploring various acrylic mediums and application methods to create illusions of depth with the merest suggestion (please excuse the pun) of topographical details. The apparent speed of execution is just that….an apparition. There are upwards of 3, possibly 4 paintings buried in the decayed vegetation and peat bogs of earlier compositions.

If you are searching for the site of the Mere today you should not be looking for low-lying areas, as you might expect, but rather for very slightly higher ground. The reason for this strange phenomenon can be found by thinking about what happened to the land when it was drained.

The Great Level of the Fens is the largest region of fen in eastern England: including the lower drainage basins of the River Nene and the Great Ouse, it covers about 500 sq miles. It is also known as the Bedford Level, after Francis Russell, 4th Earl of Bedford, who headed the so-called adventurers in the 17th-century drainage in this area; his son became the first governor of the Bedford Level Corporation. In the 17th century, the Great Level was divided into the North, Middle and South Levels for the purposes of administration and maintenance.

Please note that this painting uses iridescent paint and changes quite significantly depending on the angle of view. It is therefore quite difficult to convey the subtle shifts in tone, colour and luminance through the medium of photography.