Street Fashion: Shinjuku, Tokyo,

See below for 2016 style chart….must be one of those………maybe

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  • Gothic Lolita – is Lolita with a heavy influence from the Eastern and Victorian Goth style. Often characterized by dark colors, crosses, bats and spiders, as well as other popular gothic ‘icons’. Victorian iron gates and architectural designs are also often seen in dress prints. Skirts are usually worn knee length with petticoats beneath for volume. Blouses or shirts are lace-trimmed or ruffled in the Victorian style. Knee length socks with boots, bonnets, brooches, and a parasol finish out this style of Lolita.
  • Sweet Lolita – is the most childlike style, mostly characterized by baby animals, fairy tale themes and innocent, childlike attire. It was originally inspired by Victorian children’s clothing and Alice in Wonderland. Hello Kitty, Rilakkuma and other cute pop culture characters are popular among the Sweet lolitas. Pastel colors are used, as well as other muted colors like black and dark reds and blues. Large headbows, cute purses, elegant parasols and stuffed animals are popular accessories for Sweet Lolita.
  • Punk Lolita – An experimental style, mixing the influences of Punk with Lolita. It can sometimes look deconstructed or crazy, while keeping most of the ‘Lolita silhouette’.
  • Classic Lolita is very traditional. It is more business-like and focuses on light colors such as, blue, green, and red.
  • Kodona, a.k.a. ‘boystyle’ and ouji, is a more masculine counterpart of lolita, influenced by Victorian boys’ clothing. ‘Prince pants’, which are short capri-style pants that are cut off the knee, usually with some sort of detail (such as lace-edged cuffs) are commonly worn with masculine blouses, top hats, knee socks etc

A street near Shinjuku Station, Tokyo

Serving as the main connecting hub for rail traffic between Tokyo’s special wards and Western Tokyo on inter-city rail, commuter rail, and metro lines, the station was used by an average of 3.64 million people per day in 2007, making it, by far, the world’s busiest transport hub (and registered as such with Guinness World Records). The station itself has 36 platforms, including an underground arcade, above ground arcade and numerous hallways. There are well over 200 exits. Another 17 platforms (51 total) can be accessed through hallways to 5 directly connected stations without surfacing outside.

Wikipedia

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Shinkansen: Row 20 , Window  E

Japan is where regular, high-speed railways were born. The country’s Shinkansen (‘Bullet Train’) network has been developed over more than 35 years, and covers all main trunk routes. Three types of trains operate on the Shinkansen routes. Nozomi are the fastest and most modern trains – the dramatically-styled 500 Series. The type is distinguished by its 15 metre-long power car nose, giving an extremely aerodynamic profile. The driver’s cab has a dome canopy, to allow excellent forward vision.

The 500 Series also boasts an innovative pantograph design, shaped like a wing, which also helps reduce wind resistance at high speed. Drivers’ instruments are all laid out in groups according to their function. Extensive soundproofing means there is little sensation of speed inside trains, and wind noise is at a minimum.

Fuji X100S: f2, 1/125, ISO 3200

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