photograph of a Fenland Road

This is an archetypal Fenland landscape, just near Gold Hill, close to the Old Bedford River. There are no physical hills in the Fenlands even though fanciful hills are declared in abundance. It is either stoic irony or wishful thinking, or both. The flat road stretches towards the horizon like a low budget American road movie, neither the weather nor a distant mountain range conspire to underpin this popular genre. With squatters’ rights, the dark, opaque sky occupies the usual space above the horizon whilst in other latitudes, the world coexists in technicolor.

Telegraph Pole and Tree in the fof

The Fenland landscape belongs to Winter. In football terms, Summer relegates the Fenlands to the third division or possibly a non-league team. How do you compete with the beauty of the English Lakes, the peak district and Dartmoor? There is nothing of the traditional picturesque here but there is something elemental and prosaic. This is a functional world of telegraph poles, dykes, rivers, drainage ditches, tree lines, and flat open fields. Winter strips away all delusions and leaves us with brutal yet magnificent honesty and directness.

Ely Cathedral and

Photography differs from painting. Paintings liberate the artist from the tyranny of the subject and the objectivity of the lens. You can manipulate a photograph to create impossible realities and surreal events, but the light from objects passing through an optic is the starting point. Chance is a key element in a successful photograph, the chance alignment of distinct elements such as lighting, weather, people and place. What are the chances of standing in front of Ely Cathedral in a dense fog as a silhouetted monastic figure walks towards the Gothic doorway? Clearly, much higher than you would imagine if you photograph the Cathedral as many times as I do.

Lumix G9 Olympus 12-40 mm lens

Ely Cathedral is an architectural treasure and you certainly should make a special journey to see it. I have looked at the Cathedral in every imaginable quality of light and in all seasons, but nothing reveals the grandeur of this magnificent Gothic structure better than early morning mist in Winter. The detail vanishes in the half-light like one of Monet’s evocative depictions of Rouen Cathedral; individual elements are secondary to the ultimate power and presence of the building.

This image was taken with a Lumix G9 and Olympus 12 40 f2.8 lens.