Abstract Landscape painting
Abstract Landscape painting using cold wax medium

Artists are always searching for new materials and different ways of representing their feelings, their thoughts and ideas. The medium of cold wax provides a gateway into a world of experimental techniques and creative possibilities. The key ingredients are inexpensive and are relatively simple to combine using an old pan and a griddle. I use a basic recipe of 3 parts turpentine and 1 part beeswax. If I need a softer, more fluid medium I add more turpentine to the mix.

This painting is a mixed media work on a 40 x 40 cm canvas and I have used paper collage and card to establish different relief levels within the painting. The cold wax is a versatile medium and will act as an adhesive layer besides providing opportunities to apply heavy impasto. The rapid drying times speed up the working process and allow swift changes. By varying the oil paint and medium ratio, opacity and translucency can adjusted. Sgraffito techniques can also be used.

This work is an evocation of the Cambridgeshire Fenlands. This is an unforgiving, flat landscape, gouged and crisscrossed by rivers and dykes. It owes its existence to the draining of the Fens by Dutch engineers over 400 years ago and makes no claim to sentimental notions of a pastoral idyll. It is, however, honest, direct, immediate and without pretence… this is genuine beauty, artless charm and magnificence.

‘Neu Wald’

This highly textured painting on a solid oak block has just been sold to a collector in Scotland. Oak has a very dense grain and provides a resilient surface for the cold wax process. A variety of tools can be used with confidence to create a range of natural textures and fine surface markings. Multiple layers of wax have been used to generate the illusion of depth and translucency.

‘Neu Wald’ (detail)

I have just been working on a commission based on one of my recent New Forest paintings. It has taken over two months from start to completion and I am genuinely pleased with final outcome. For those of you who have worked on a commission before you will know that they can sometimes be problematic. I think it is extremely important to be clear about the nature of the painting process and to communicate this through discussion with the other party.

Each painting is inevitably unique and few artists would be able to recreate an existing painting or exact copy unless the style owed more to photographic realism and/or geometric precision. You will see from the close up details that this painting has been developed through the application of successive layers of oil paint and cold wax medium. The raised surface and tactile nature of the work embodies the textural qualities of the subject matter.

Landscape painting of a forest, heavy impasto and texture

DSCF1018

Each image in this Fenland Landscape collection has been created using a series of texture layers with additional editing in Adobe Lightroom.

‘Even here, we go carefully, for cartography itself is not a neutral activity. The drawing of maps is full of colonial echoes. The civilised eye seeks to view the world from above, as something we can stand over and survey. The Uncivilised writer knows the world is, rather, something we are enmeshed in — a patchwork and a framework of places, experiences, sights, smells, sounds. Maps can lead, but can also mislead. Our maps must be the kind sketched in the dust with a stick, washed away by the next rain. They can be read only by those who ask to see them, and they cannot be bought’.