The Institute of East Anglian Artists Open Exhibition 2021

The Institute of East Anglian Artists Open Exhibition is held annually at The Gallery, Holt, North Norfolk. The IEA represents the best emerging and established artists in the region.

This year, my mixed media acrylic painting ‘Chromatic Interval’ will be part of the exhibition. The show runs from Saturday 15 – 25 May. Click on the painting for location details and opening times.

‘Stone & Water’ Oil and Cold Wax on 80 x 80 cm canvas
‘Stone & Water’ Oil and Cold Wax on 80 x 80 cm canvas (detail)

This is a cold wax mixed media painting on a high quality canvas frame. It is based on my experience of the Fenland landscape. It is not a visual record of a specific place, or a celebration of a well known structure or familiar location. I am interested in surfaces and textures and the way materials can be combined to create tactile qualities. Cold wax can be applied in thin layers or heavy impasto. It can be scored, scoured and burnished like a rich stoneware ceramic glaze; it can left dry, broken, fragmented and uneven.

“Bones are patient. Bones never tire nor do they run away. When you come upon a man who has been dead many years, his bones will still be lying there, in place, content, patiently waiting, but his flesh will have gotten up and left him. Water is like flesh. Water will not stand still. It is always off to somewhere else; restless, talkative, and curious. Even water in a covered jar will disappear in time. Flesh is water. Stones are like bones. Satisfied. Patient. Dependable. Tell me, then, Alobar, in order to achieve immortality, should you emulate water or stone? Should you trust your flesh or your bones?”

Tom Robbins, Jitterbug Perfume

‘A Kind of Grief’ Oil and Cold Wax on 80 x 80 cm canvas
‘A Kind of Grief’ Oil and Cold Wax on 80 x 80 cm canvas (Detail)

This is a cold wax mixed media painting on a high quality canvas frame. It is based on my recent artist residency in the New Forest in Hampshire. I spent a number of days walking amongst the trees and gathering information for a series of paintings through drawing and photography; I wanted to absorb the sights and sounds of the trees in the forest and find a way to recreate something of that experience in paint.

I am interested in surfaces and textures and the way materials can be combined to create tactile qualities. Cold wax can be applied in thin layers or heavy impasto. It can be scored, scoured and burnished like a rich stoneware ceramic glaze; it can left dry, broken, fragmented and uneven.

The trees are coming into leaf
Like something almost being said;
The recent buds relax and spread,
Their greenness is a kind of grief.

Is it that they are born again
And we grow old? No, they die too,
Their yearly trick of looking new
Is written down in rings of grain.

Yet still the unresting castles thresh
In fullgrown thickness every May.
Last year is dead, they seem to say,
Begin afresh, afresh, afresh.

Philip Larkin

This painting is currentlyon show in Bury St Edmunds at the Art In East Anglia Gallery www.artineastanglia.com

Oil & Cold Wax on Canvas 80 x 80 cm
Oil & Cold Wax on Canvas 80 x 80 cm (detail)

The painting above is currently on show at the Art in East Anglia Gallery in Bury St Edmunds alongside three other works from my New Forest residency.

This is a cold wax mixed media painting on a high quality canvas frame. It is based on my recent artist residency in the New Forest in Hampshire. I spent a number of days walking amongst the trees and gathering information for a series of paintings through drawing and photography; I wanted to absorb the sights and sounds of the trees in the forest and find a way to recreate something of that experience in paint.

I am interested in surfaces and textures and the way materials can be combined to create tactile qualities. Cold wax can be applied in thin layers or heavy impasto. It can be scored, scoured and burnished like a rich stoneware ceramic glaze; it can left dry, broken, fragmented and uneven.

This painting is based on reflections seen in one of the many streams that carve a pathway through the New Forest; the water is often stained deep orange with iron minerals from the surrounding rocks.

Art in East Anglia, 10 Langton Place, Bury St Edmunds

Kingdom of Mercia 2
‘The Kingdom of Mercia’ 80 x 80 cm by Peter Corr
This painting is currently on show at The Old Fire Engine House in Ely, Cambridgshire, UK. The materials used include oil, cold wax, bitumen, pumice stone and plaster scrim. The title is essentially poetic and does not refer to a specific place or location; my recent landscape paintings are a reflection of my understanding and experience of the Fenland landscape of Cambridgeshire. I am interested in the evocative power of abstract imagery to engage us and to challenge our need to find meaning and purpose in what may appear to be arbitrary shapes, marks, tones and textures.    
Kingdom of Mercia.jpg
Detail:  ‘The Kingdom of Mercia’ by Peter Corr