Abstract textured landscape painting by peter corr impasto texture artist
‘Till’
Mixed Media on Canvas 60 x 60 x 4 cm
£
365
SOLD

This is a mixed-media landscape painting on a 61cm x 61cm deep edge canvas. It is semi abstract and expressionistic in terms of technique and style. It is based on my day to day experience of living in the dramatic Fenland landscape of East Cambridgeshire in England. The word ’till’ is interchangeable with ‘until’ and I have tried to reflect both meanings in this piece. Working with the land is about understanding time and intervals of time, it is about rhythms of activity and inactivity, of waiting, of anticipating……until. It can also refer to a vault; a place to hold treasure.

The heavy texture of the painting combines gesso, sand, plaster, marble dust, bitumen and oil paint. The material and paint is applied with a variety of tools including brushes and palette knives. The surface is built up in layers and glazes over a period of time. I have been influenced by the contemporary artists Anselm Kiefer and Gerhardt Richter.

Gold Hill: A Painting by Peter Corr

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Gold Hill A Painting by Peter Corr
Gold Hill:A Painting by Peter Corr
Gold Hill Detail Abstract Painting on Wood by Peter Corr
Gold Hill (detail)

There are no hills in the Fenlands, but here and there low ridges break the flatness. In our fevered imaginations these 5 to 10 metres of reluctant altitude become the golden hills of a shared aspiration. Keen cyclists who have lived here far longer than they really ought to, speak of ‘brutally steep inclines’, ‘body position’ and ‘low gear momentum’. As painters, we take liberties with the time/space continuum…..creating our own interpretation of events. It isn’t a translation, its more of a transcription. Or maybe it’s the other way around.

Vale of Eden 120 x 70 x 4 cm Acrylic on Canvas

Mixed Media & Acrylic painting  on Canvas
‘Vale of Eden’

I completed this relatively large acrylic piece about 2 years ago and it is definitely lighter and more colourful than my recent work. Generally abstract in terms of technique it is loosely based on the rhythms and cycles of growth seen in nature. I guess we all go through cycles in our approach to painting – and life – moving between what might be considered irrational exuberance and returning to the safe haven of sober reflection.

The surface is built up with impasto medium, combined with tissue, leaves, newsprint and card. In the later stages, translucent glazes have been added to increase the perception of depth and luminosity. I have long since arrived at the conclusion that my fascination with Cubism and Futurism is inherent in everything I do creatively.


In April 2018, I completed a two week residency in the New Forest. The residency was awarded to the winner of a competition organised by the UK based company ‘Little Van Gogh’. I was given the opportunity to work in a studio located above a blacksmiths workshop near the village of Ashurst in the New Forest. This was a wonderful experience in many ways and an extremely productive period for me creatively. I am still working on paintings and ideas that have developed from the residency and I will be holding an exhibition of the completed works next year. View my New Forest Series here.

Abstract painting on canvas
100 x 100 x 4 cm

This is a painting about perception and movement, about how we catch glimpses of the world around us and then proceed to construct a reality we can live with. I cycle most days – you know the bike is surely one of our greatest inventions – covering about 10 miles or so at a fairly leisurely pace. I enjoy being in and moving through the landscape, experiencing the changes in light and colour each day inevitably brings. Sometimes around this time of year, the sky is an intense blue and the warm sun flickers through the gaps between trees and hedgerows. Even at my pedestrian pace, I rarely register details, just a kaleidoscopic collection of shapes, colours and textures bombarding the retina. The futurists new a thing or two about the art of seeing.

The materials include: oil paint, cold wax, metallic enamel.

This is a large painting on stretched canvas (100 x 120 cm) using readily sourced materials; these include bitumen, plaster, wax, oil, bleach and enamel paint. The landscape of the fens is a difficult subject to represent with any degree of fidelity. It certainly fails in terms of accepted notions of pastoral beauty. Being primarily flat, agricultural and man made, this landscape exists without obvious grandeur and distinguishing features. Endless dykes and artificial waterways inscribe, demarcate and score the surface. Visiting the same locations throughout the year there is a sense of intermittent yet cyclical activity; the earth is repeatedly gouged, scoured, exploited, exhausted, replaced and renewed. This painting is an attempt to reflect those processes over time.

Detail
Peter Corr Abstract painting landscape
Detail

I have recently been sketching with an Apple pencil, iPad, and the software, ProCreate. I have to say I’m very impressed with the flexibility and ease of the system. I know it doesn’t have the ultimate aesthetic qualities of graphite and the tactility of a paper surface, but the experience of drawing digitally has a great deal to recommend it. I did a series of illustrations a few years ago using Photodhop and aWacom tablet which was ok but the disconnect between the pen, tablet and screen took a while to navigate. Drawing directly on the ipad has far greater convenience and simplicity and so far…its been great fun! If you are an artist or illustrator and have experience of Pro Create I would love to know your thoughts. I have a lot to learn.

100 x 70 cm on canvas
landscape painting on canvas of a forest
Detail
Detail

This painting is currently on view at the exhibition at Storey’s Field Centre in Cambridge at Eddington Ave, Cambridge CB3 1AA .

This painting, as with many of my recent pieces, has been inspired by my residency in the New Forest in England. The title refers to the sense of architectural power conveyed by the towering, magnificent columns of ancient trees. For me, the forest does indeed represent an authentic spiritual temple and is a precursor to all of our man made structures.

The medium is oil and cold wax. I hope the additional detail photographs will allow you to see the complexity of the surface texture within the darkness of the forest undergrowth.

Cambridge Open Art Exhibition Top Twenty

Thursday 24th October – 21st November

Showings
Mondays 09:00 to 20:00
Tuesdays 09:00 to 20:00
Wednesdays 09:00 to 20:00
Thursday to Sunday times vary depending on other bookings at the Centre. 

Detail

In the last day or so I have added additional layers to this work and tried to ensure that the selected materials interact in both challenging and unexpected ways. The inclusion of shellac and emulsion paint with powdered pumice stone creates unpredictable textural qualities and patina. Gloss, satin and matt painting media combine to reflect and absorb light. Bitumen, partially diluted with turpentine has been allowed to flow across the surface settling in crevices and darker pools. I am much happier with the overall direction of the work now, although it would be fair to say that the more experimental approach has clearly resulted in a loss of definition and resolution. Whether this is acceptable in the long run…only tomorrow will tell, when I begin all over again.

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