Devils Dyke

Devils Dyke

Devil’s Dyke is the largest of several earthworks in south Cambridgeshire that were designed to control movement along the ancient Roman roads. When it was created, it completely blocked a narrow land corridor between the southern edge of a region of water-logged marsh (now known as The Fens) in the north-west and dense woodlands in the south, so making circumvention difficult and forming an effective defensive barrier for the lands to the east. The dyke crossed three important Roman roads, including the ancient Icknield Way, and may thus have served as a way of controlling trade and movement in and out of the area.

16 by 12 for printing (5)

The Light Series

 

I have been developing a series of semi abstract images that I call ‘The Light Series’. They represent a personal response to the landscape of the East Anglian Fenlands and are focused almost exclusively on the changing qualities of light and atmospheric conditions; different times of the day and times of year can be seen in each work. The Fenlands consist of a patchwork of reclaimed land, reed marshes, meandering rivers and ‘arrow straight’ man made waterways. In these digital reproductions it may be difficult to see the soft colour and tonal shifts; the final images are a product of successive layers of acrylic glaze applied heavily and then carefully erased to reveal veils of colour.”
AfterGlow

AfterGlow

new

 

This painting is part of ‘The Light’ series. It measures 80 x 80 cm and is based on the landscape of the Cambridgeshire Fenlands. The effect of depth and translucency is achieved by a process of layering and erasing. Paint has been thinned with a glazing medium,  liberally applied with large brushes then partially removed with an assortment of old ‘T shirts’ and cloths. The parallels with stratification, sedimentation, accretion, erosion geology are potentially poetic yet alas coincidental………….ah, but are they?

Tansubstantiation

Tansubstantiation

This is an image taken of Ely Cathedral on a cold, damp November evening. Final editing consists of tonal and colour adjustments.  'Built by William the Conqueror as a prominent outpost after the bloody and lengthy rebellion by Hereward The Wake, Ely Cathedral stands as a fine example of William's devotion to his Religion and to his overwhelming victory for the Heart's and Minds of that mixed of all races called the britons'.  'Less well known is that
This is an image taken of Ely Cathedral, shrouded in fog on a cold, damp November evening. Editing consists of tonal and colour adjustments.
‘Built by William the Conqueror as a prominent outpost after the bloody and lengthy rebellion by Hereward The Wake, Ely Cathedral stands as a fine example of William’s devotion to his Religion and to his overwhelming victory for the Heart’s and Minds of that mixed of all races called the britons’.
‘Less well known is that “The Lord Protector”, OLIVER CROMWELL closed the Cathedral for 10 years, or thereabouts, due to a falling out with the local (Catholic) Clergy. Cromwell used it as a stable for his Calvary Horses’!