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Landford is a large mixed media painting on a 122cm x 92cm professional quality canvas. It was produced from studies created during my residency in the New Forest; the work is partly expressionistic and impressionistic in terms of technique and style. The medium is cold wax and oil paint applied with a variety of tools including brushes and palette knives. The surface is built up in heavy impasto and alternately glazed over a period of time.

I have been influenced by the contemporary artists Anselm Kiefer and Gerhardt Richter. If you have a moment, take a closer look at the detailed photographs to gain a more tangible sense of the textural qualities in this work.

 

IMG_9937John Wise, author of The New Forest: Its History and Scenery, first published in 1862, knew a thing or two about the New Forest.

He offered this suggestion: ‘The best advice which I can give to see the New Forest is to follow the course of one of its streams, to make it your friend and companion, and go wherever it goes. It will be sure to take you through the greenest valleys, and past the thickest woods, and under the largest trees. No step along with it is ever lost, for it never goes out of its way but in search of some fresh beauty’.

I followed John’s advice and followed the Ditchend Brook yesterday, which I have to acknowledge doesn’t necessarily sound promising, but ……..what’s in a name? Always look beyond the label

And there are many streams to choose from: Linford Brook, Dockens Water, Latchmore Brook, Ditchend Brook, Mill Lawn Brook, Highland Water, Black Water, Ober Water, Bartley Water, the Lymington River, the Beaulieu River and far, far more. I think I may have some titles for my work.

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Walking in the Newe Forest near Ashurst this morning I came across this colossal uprooted tree. To give you an idea of the dimensions, I am about 5′ 8″, and standing next to it, my eye level was roughly at the centre of the root system. Paul Klee often used the tree as a symbol or analogy….I am beginning to understand what he means.

‘….the descent into the earth has to do with unearthing,
however provisionally and intermittently, structures and hieroglyphs
‘constituting the archaic ground and pulsating heart of phenomena, sustaining their ongoing change. It involves remaining more intimately true to nature than naturalism,
which treats the surface superficially, failing to understand its depth.’
i.e., non-simplicity and metamorphic vitality