Tokyu Plaza Omotesando Harajuku

Tokyu Plaza Omotesando Harajuku

Hall of Mirrors

 

The mirrored entrance to Tokyu Plaza in the Shibuya district provides a perfect opportunity to create fragmented images of people as they walk by this busy shopping area. Multiple reflections overlap, merge and intersect like a giant kaleidoscope or contemporary Cubist image. I was mesmerised by the constellation of shapes as bodies appeared, disappeared and reappeared in a constant swirl of motion.

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Angelic Pretty

Street Fashion: Shinjuku, Tokyo,

See below for 2016 style chart….must be one of those………maybe

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  • Gothic Lolita – is Lolita with a heavy influence from the Eastern and Victorian Goth style. Often characterized by dark colors, crosses, bats and spiders, as well as other popular gothic ‘icons’. Victorian iron gates and architectural designs are also often seen in dress prints. Skirts are usually worn knee length with petticoats beneath for volume. Blouses or shirts are lace-trimmed or ruffled in the Victorian style. Knee length socks with boots, bonnets, brooches, and a parasol finish out this style of Lolita.
  • Sweet Lolita – is the most childlike style, mostly characterized by baby animals, fairy tale themes and innocent, childlike attire. It was originally inspired by Victorian children’s clothing and Alice in Wonderland. Hello Kitty, Rilakkuma and other cute pop culture characters are popular among the Sweet lolitas. Pastel colors are used, as well as other muted colors like black and dark reds and blues. Large headbows, cute purses, elegant parasols and stuffed animals are popular accessories for Sweet Lolita.
  • Punk Lolita – An experimental style, mixing the influences of Punk with Lolita. It can sometimes look deconstructed or crazy, while keeping most of the ‘Lolita silhouette’.
  • Classic Lolita is very traditional. It is more business-like and focuses on light colors such as, blue, green, and red.
  • Kodona, a.k.a. ‘boystyle’ and ouji, is a more masculine counterpart of lolita, influenced by Victorian boys’ clothing. ‘Prince pants’, which are short capri-style pants that are cut off the knee, usually with some sort of detail (such as lace-edged cuffs) are commonly worn with masculine blouses, top hats, knee socks etc

A street in Shinjuku, Tokyo

A street near Shinjuku Station, Tokyo

Serving as the main connecting hub for rail traffic between Tokyo’s special wards and Western Tokyo on inter-city rail, commuter rail, and metro lines, the station was used by an average of 3.64 million people per day in 2007, making it, by far, the world’s busiest transport hub (and registered as such with Guinness World Records). The station itself has 36 platforms, including an underground arcade, above ground arcade and numerous hallways. There are well over 200 exits. Another 17 platforms (51 total) can be accessed through hallways to 5 directly connected stations without surfacing outside.

Wikipedia

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Reading on the Ginza Line, Tokyo

Reading on the Ginza Line, Tokyo

From my brief reading of travel literature, everyone who has visited Japan comments on the calm and serenity that they experience, the all encompassing sense of order and civility. This is a country were inner tranquillity, or at least its outward appearance, is effortlessly maintained.

I hope to post a few photographs over the next week or so that attempt to capture something of the spirit of the people and the place.

Fuji X100S   f2, 1/50th, ISO 2500, Fuji Mono Red Setting

 

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Fontaine Bartholdi, Lyon

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La Fontaine Bartholdi is a fountain sculpted by Frédéric Auguste Bartholdi(who also created the statue of liberty in New York) and realised in 1889 by Gaget & Gautier. It was erected at the Place des Terreaux, in the 1st arrondissement of Lyon, in September 1892.
Pour conclure, je dirais qu’il convient d’être toujours prudent avant de monter sur ses grands chevaux.

Cabaret Voltaire

Cabaret Voltaire

Automata

The cabaret featured spoken word, dance and music. The soirees were often raucous events with artists experimenting with new forms of performance, such as sound poetry and simultaneous poetry. Mirroring the maelstrom of World War I raging around it, the art it exhibited was often chaotic and brutal. On at least one occasion, the audience attacked the Cabaret’s stage. Though the Cabaret was to be the birthplace of the Dadaist movement, it featured artists from every sector of the avant-garde, including Futurism’s Marinetti. The Cabaret exhibited radically experimental artists, many of whom went on to change the face of their artistic disciplines; featured artists included Wassily Kandinsky, Paul Klee, Giorgio de Chirico, Sophie Taeuber-Arp, and Max Ernst.

 

Wikipedia 2016