‘Elasticity’ Umberto Boccioini
Museo del Novecento
‘Elasticity’ Umberto Boccioini
Museo del Novecento

It would be a minor miracle to achieve a small percentage of Umberto Boccioni’s creative output in 66 years…. well 67 years to be precise.

“We shall sing the great masses shaken with work, pleasure, or rebellion; we shall sing the multicoloured and polyphonic tidal waves of revolution in the modern metropolis.” The Founding and Manifesto of Futurism. Marinetti

The influence of Cubism on the Futurist painter Boccioni is apparent in this detail from the painting ‘Elasticity’ (below) and the watercolour study (above). For me, the art world has not moved significantly beyond Cubism in the last 100 years. Cubism established the dissolution of space and time, Futurism added a dynamic context focusing on kinetics.

Once you have decided that the world is multi-faceted and in constant motion, the notion of a fixed viewpoint collapses under the weight of reason and quantum physics. Time waits for no man. Experimental artists, painters, photographers and filmmakers continue to ‘push’ against a wide-open door. The horse has long since bolted.

The Cubists penetrated the illusionistic space of the canvas, and from that moment on, the only way back was a harmless preoccupation with design and a modicum of self-delusion. But why worry, it has kept us all therapeutically occupied ever since.

Statues in Milano, Italy
Statues in Milano, Italy

If you believe access to Art is an essential component of a life well-lived – assuming basic critical needs have been met – then you might decide to live in the Northern city of Milan. Architectural beauty exists on almost every street corner in the city centre of this commercial metropolis, and it is a visual and spiritual delight. When you also factor in the high probability of coming across sculptures of this quality, adorning a facade or the entrance to a doorway, you know you are in a place where life and art coexist and complement each other. It was E. M. Forster who said, ‘Only connect the prose and the passion and both will be exalted’. I think he was on to something.

Place des Terreaux 1st arrondissement of Lyon

The man who created the Statue of Liberty in New York also created this powerful sculpture in the centre of the city of Lyon. This is just one of the horses sculpted by Frédéric Auguste Bartholdi and is part of La Fontaine Bartholdi. I have photographed this fountain from every conceivable angle and there is always a new configuration of shapes to record. This shot is vignetted to draw attention to the overwhelming sense of drama and emovement.

Peter Corr Monochrome Photography
The St. JA, Purveyors of Fine W

They say that Dublin is the City of Literature and I have to agree. It may not be W.B, Yeats or Seamus Heaney but this once fine public house is an unsung wordsmith, conjuring a poetic language of its own as it self edits into oblivion. Will you be having a jar at the St. Ja? Tis the patron saint of jars and the finest purveyors of fine W’s this side of the River Liffey. And me Darlin, says I, I don’t mind if I do.

The design of Vintage cars was about far more than engineering and technological functionality. These cars celebrated form, aesthetics and culture. The styles, colours and sculptural contours reflect the preoccupations of certain 20th Century art movements, including Art Nouveau and Art Deco; they appealed directly to the senses. Thankfully, the design constraints imposed by aerodynamics and fuel efficiency had yet to play a significant role in their appearance. Headlights, indicators, running boards and wheel arches were glorious opportunities for embellishment and ornament and there was an explosion of visual creativity. Take a look at these fantastic examples from the Technical and Transportation Museum in Budapest.

Technical and Transportation Museum, Budapest

Technical and Transportation Museum, Budapest
black vintage car
Technical and Transportation Museum, Budapest
vintage-cars
Technical and Transportation Museum, Budapest