Landford, New Forest

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‘Landford, New Forest’ 122 x 92 cm

This is a large mixed media painting on a 122cm x 92cm on a canvas frame. It was produced from studies created during my residency in the New Forest; the work is partly expressionistic and impressionistic in terms of technique and style. The key medium is cold wax and oil paint applied with a variety of tools including brushes and palette knives. The surface is built up in heavy impasto and scored, etched and systematically redrawn over a period of time.  The detail insert (below) should provide some indication of the rich tactile qualities encrusting the surface of the painting. My working method allows for various incarnations of the painting to present themselves before the final image crystallises. This work in particular has undergone numerous transformations. I originally had in mind a view of the forest infused with intense light and colour, but it has progressively mutated towards a more poetic and subdued interpretation of dusk in the forest.

I have been influenced by the contemporary artists Anselm Kiefer and Gerhardt Richter. If you have a moment, take a closer look at the detailed photographs to gain a more tangible sense of the textural qualities in this work.

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Detail from ‘Landford, New Forest’

Cradle

Abstract Landscape painting on canvas
‘Cradle’ 122 x 92 cm

This is a large mixed media painting on a 122cm x 92cm professional quality canvas. It was produced from studies created during my recent residency in the New Forest; the work is partly expressionistic and impressionistic in terms of technique and style. The medium is cold wax and oil paint applied with a variety of tools including brushes , scalpels and palette knives. The surface is built up in heavy impasto and alternately glazed and scored over a period of time.

I have been influenced by the contemporary artists Anselm Kiefer and Gerhardt Richter. If you have a moment, take a closer look at the detailed photographs to gain a more tangible sense of the textural qualities in this work.

This painting is currently on exhibition at The Old Fire Engine House in Ely until 28th October along with work from the artists Paul Janssens and Caroline Forward.

Gilded Shore

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‘Gilded Shore’  100 x 75 cm 

Gilded Shore is an abstract painting in terms of technique, style and intention. It is based on the flat, open landscapes of the East Anglian, Cambridgeshire Fenland. Semi transparent glazes give depth and luminosity as light is reflected through the layers of pigment. The variegated surface of the painting is achieved with thickly applied bitumen and cold wax medium. The lustrous quality or sheen is achieved through a combination of burnishing the wax surface and interleaved layers of metallic paint. A variety of tools and implements have been used to create incisions, marks and subtle textures that can be read as earth, sky, and water. The restricted references to three dimensional space is designed to create a subtle counterpoint the pictorial flatness of the deep raw and burnt umbers.

 

Empire of The Sun

Empire of The Sun

Acrylic on canvas

Size: 100 x 100 x 2cm

This is a multi layered acrylic painting on a high quality canvas frame. In this larger scale work I have been preoccupied with the rhythmic qualities of hand writing and calligraphy; I have tried to infuse the surface of the canvas with a sense of light and intensity. There is no over arching composition here; all of the myriad small brush-stokes and simple forms connect with and relate to each other. Below the radiating surface of indecipherable marks, there is a counterpoint of horizontal bands of tone and colour, echoing land and distant horizons.

 

https://www.artfinder.com/manage/peter-corr/product/empire-of-the-sun-26da/

untitled (3 of 48)

Western Shore

Western Shore

untitled (1 of 26)

 

This is an acrylic painting measuring 80 x 80 cm on canvas. It is based on the landscape of the Great Fen, thought to have once been covered by Whittlesea Mere. I have been exploring various acrylic mediums and application methods to create illusions of depth with the merest suggestion (please excuse the pun) of topographical details. The apparent speed of execution is just that….an apparition. There are upwards of 3, possibly 4 paintings buried in the decayed vegetation and peat bogs of earlier compositions.

If you are searching for the site of the Mere today you should not be looking for low-lying areas, as you might expect, but rather for very slightly higher ground. The reason for this strange phenomenon can be found by thinking about what happened to the land when it was drained.

The Great Level of the Fens is the largest region of fen in eastern England: including the lower drainage basins of the River Nene and the Great Ouse, it covers about 500 sq miles. It is also known as the Bedford Level, after Francis Russell, 4th Earl of Bedford, who headed the so-called adventurers in the 17th-century drainage in this area; his son became the first governor of the Bedford Level Corporation. In the 17th century, the Great Level was divided into the North, Middle and South Levels for the purposes of administration and maintenance.

Please note that this painting uses iridescent paint and changes quite significantly depending on the angle of view. It is therefore quite difficult to convey the subtle shifts in tone, colour and luminance through the medium of photography.

The Light Series

 

I have been developing a series of semi abstract images that I call ‘The Light Series’. They represent a personal response to the landscape of the East Anglian Fenlands and are focused almost exclusively on the changing qualities of light and atmospheric conditions; different times of the day and times of year can be seen in each work. The Fenlands consist of a patchwork of reclaimed land, reed marshes, meandering rivers and ‘arrow straight’ man made waterways. In these digital reproductions it may be difficult to see the soft colour and tonal shifts; the final images are a product of successive layers of acrylic glaze applied heavily and then carefully erased to reveal veils of colour.”
AfterGlow

AfterGlow

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This painting is part of ‘The Light’ series. It measures 80 x 80 cm and is based on the landscape of the Cambridgeshire Fenlands. The effect of depth and translucency is achieved by a process of layering and erasing. Paint has been thinned with a glazing medium,  liberally applied with large brushes then partially removed with an assortment of old ‘T shirts’ and cloths. The parallels with stratification, sedimentation, accretion, erosion geology are potentially poetic yet alas coincidental………….ah, but are they?

The Light Series

The Light Series

Nightfall

This is a series of 80cm x 80cm acrylic paintings on high quality canvas frames. These images represent a personal reflection on landscape at different times of the day as the seasons and the light ebbs and flows……they are based on the open fields and skies of the fenland in East Anglia. No one should feel confined or constrained by a particular location; these paintings have no topographical information to act as a compass or guide, they use the universal language of horizontals and geometric divisions……earth and sky, often in unequal partnership. They are an archetype, a diagram or blueprint, a stripped back code symbolizing the fundamentals of walking upright and looking out across the land; just as we have always done.