Abstract landscape paintings

‘Patchwork’ 40 x 51 cm Acrylic on 300 gsm paper
‘Patchwork’ Detail

Language is a wonderful invention, the moment we are presented with a new word, meanings shift and change, conjuring a world of ideas and thoughts. This painting is a patchwork of shapes inspired by the work of the Swiss artist Paul Klee. It uses geometric shapes, intense tonal contrast and iridescent highlights. There is a suggestion of land enclosures, rivers, lakes and isolated dwellings. There is also a strong sense of rhythm and chord like sequences of colour. It is designed to be warm, uplifting and meditative. I loved the process of creating it.

Acrylic on Paper 20 ” x 16″

The geometric forms in Paul Klee’s compositions have always fascinated me. There is a natural rhythm to his paintings and a disarming simplicity. They look like brightly coloured patchwork quilts. A love of music influenced him, and the recurring motifs and shapes are reminiscent of chordal and harmonic structures. This is a work in progress and I am continuing to experiment with tonal contrast and scale.

‘Walking on Sunset’ Acrylic on Paper
‘Walking on Sunset’ Detail

This is one of a series of acrylic paintings on hand made 300 gsm paper and I’m enjoying the immediacy of working on this high quality textured surface. The shapes and colours of the painting show exuberance and optimism and a delight in the here and now. The curved and straight lines celebrate visual contrast and compositional balance. There is a flowing movement from left to right across the picture plane, which together with the warm colours begins to explain the choice of title. You will no doubt see elements of both Cubism and Futurism in the multi-faceted viewpoints and the intriguing interplay of foreground and background spaces.

Marcel Duchamp had a conceptual art piece called ‘Black Widow’, it was a play on the notion of windows and widows, Newnham College in Cambridge is no less surreal with their entry, ‘Autumn Window’. There is an optical illusion taking place here but I can’t quite decide how or why. I guess it has something to do with defeated expectations…we are accustomed to windows as architectural features within the context of a brick or concrete facade These are disembodied windows trapped in autumn undergrowth. The windows appear against a fluid, dissolving and decaying backdrop.