‘Stone & Water’ Oil and Cold Wax on 80 x 80 cm canvas
‘Stone & Water’ Oil and Cold Wax on 80 x 80 cm canvas (detail)

This is a cold wax mixed media painting on a high quality canvas frame. It is based on my experience of the Fenland landscape. It is not a visual record of a specific place, or a celebration of a well known structure or familiar location. I am interested in surfaces and textures and the way materials can be combined to create tactile qualities. Cold wax can be applied in thin layers or heavy impasto. It can be scored, scoured and burnished like a rich stoneware ceramic glaze; it can left dry, broken, fragmented and uneven.

“Bones are patient. Bones never tire nor do they run away. When you come upon a man who has been dead many years, his bones will still be lying there, in place, content, patiently waiting, but his flesh will have gotten up and left him. Water is like flesh. Water will not stand still. It is always off to somewhere else; restless, talkative, and curious. Even water in a covered jar will disappear in time. Flesh is water. Stones are like bones. Satisfied. Patient. Dependable. Tell me, then, Alobar, in order to achieve immortality, should you emulate water or stone? Should you trust your flesh or your bones?”

Tom Robbins, Jitterbug Perfume

‘A Kind of Grief’ Oil and Cold Wax on 80 x 80 cm canvas
‘A Kind of Grief’ Oil and Cold Wax on 80 x 80 cm canvas (Detail)

This is a cold wax mixed media painting on a high quality canvas frame. It is based on my recent artist residency in the New Forest in Hampshire. I spent a number of days walking amongst the trees and gathering information for a series of paintings through drawing and photography; I wanted to absorb the sights and sounds of the trees in the forest and find a way to recreate something of that experience in paint.

I am interested in surfaces and textures and the way materials can be combined to create tactile qualities. Cold wax can be applied in thin layers or heavy impasto. It can be scored, scoured and burnished like a rich stoneware ceramic glaze; it can left dry, broken, fragmented and uneven.

The trees are coming into leaf
Like something almost being said;
The recent buds relax and spread,
Their greenness is a kind of grief.

Is it that they are born again
And we grow old? No, they die too,
Their yearly trick of looking new
Is written down in rings of grain.

Yet still the unresting castles thresh
In fullgrown thickness every May.
Last year is dead, they seem to say,
Begin afresh, afresh, afresh.

Philip Larkin

This painting is currentlyon show in Bury St Edmunds at the Art In East Anglia Gallery www.artineastanglia.com

Oil & Cold Wax on Canvas 80 x 80 cm
Oil & Cold Wax on Canvas 80 x 80 cm (detail)

The painting above is currently on show at the Art in East Anglia Gallery in Bury St Edmunds alongside three other works from my New Forest residency.

This is a cold wax mixed media painting on a high quality canvas frame. It is based on my recent artist residency in the New Forest in Hampshire. I spent a number of days walking amongst the trees and gathering information for a series of paintings through drawing and photography; I wanted to absorb the sights and sounds of the trees in the forest and find a way to recreate something of that experience in paint.

I am interested in surfaces and textures and the way materials can be combined to create tactile qualities. Cold wax can be applied in thin layers or heavy impasto. It can be scored, scoured and burnished like a rich stoneware ceramic glaze; it can left dry, broken, fragmented and uneven.

This painting is based on reflections seen in one of the many streams that carve a pathway through the New Forest; the water is often stained deep orange with iron minerals from the surrounding rocks.

Art in East Anglia, 10 Langton Place, Bury St Edmunds

Fenland

Fenland By Peter M Corr

Photo book

Book Preview

Followers of this blog will have an idea about the number of photographs I have taken of the Cambridgeshire Fenlands. I had many images on this theme and collated them in a book using the Bookwright software. What you will find here is an edited collection and some of these shots you may have already seen. Most of the captures included were taken during the Winter of 2020/21 at the height of the COVID-19 pandemic; maybe that is why they are so dark. For me, these are archetypal images of the land I walk across and cycle through every day. It is where I live. Others will see this place very differently but this is a personal interpretation of the landscape, the roads, tracks, rivers, dykes, droves and the wetlands of East Anglia.

Christo and Jean Claude never explained, interpreted or gave meanings to their work; they didn’t need to. We will always obligingly do that for them. Writers and art critics have theorised about their ideas, conjuring a complex set of social, political, philosophical and psychological reasons why we should be interested in the art they produced. If I list many of the customary arguments here, you might consider them to be pretentious, meaningless drivel. And who knows, you may well be right. What I know is, I love the mystery and sense of wonder they created by using the unbelievably simple device of concealment, and for some reason it is far more effective if the object is relatively well known and familiar in terms of scale and shape.